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Mosaic Glass Fusion Workshop will take place in the leadership of German glass fusion artist Gabriele Küstner, known for her creative techniques in the area of fusion glass. Participants will develop and produce designs experimenting with glass fusion techniques.
Workshop Place: Design Foundation Bodrum

Workshop Dates: 5-13 November 2016

Content: Mosaic Glass Fusion Workshop will take place in the leadership of German glass fusion artist Gabriele Küstner, known for her creative techniques in the area of fusion glass. Participants will develop and produce designs experimenting with glass fusion techniques.

Interface: Glass

Leader: Gabriele Küstner - Glass Designer

Participants: Designers, artists, glass artists and designers

Gabriele Küstner - Glass Designer
Gabriele Kustner is a sought after international glass artist from Germany. She was born in 1958 and has spent a good part of her adult life creating incredible glass. She attended Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington in 1985 and 2002. From 1981-1984 and from 1984-1985 she assisted David Huchthausen at the Appalachian School of Crafts in Smithville, Tennessee. She also attended the State Polytechnics of Glass in Hadamar, Germany. Additionally, Kustner was a teaching assistant at Pilchuck from 1991-1992.

Kustner has received numerous awards over her career including but not limited to The State Award of Bavaria in Crafts (Munich, Germany), The Glass 2000 2nd Award from the Glasmuseum (Immenhausen, Germany), the Award of the Federal Glazier Council (Hadamar, Germany), the State Award of Lower Saxony for Excellence in Crafts (Hanover, Germany) and the Johann Michael Maucher Award (Schwaebisch-Gmeund, Germany). Gabriele Kustner has performed many exhibitions internationally in France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, the United States, Sweden, Switzerland, Columbia, Poland and Japan.

Much of Gabriele Kustner’s work involves the creation of intricate pieces of glass cane which are painted with China paint on the outside. The paint is “fired” on the cane and cut into many pieces with a diamond saw. These pieces are laid out and melted on to a flat sheet and the round pieces develop a “honeycomb” pattern. When you stack the pieces there are always gaps between them and when the glass gets soft it runs in to these gaps. Her “woven” pattern is a cross section of the “honeycomb” pattern. After the glass has cooled, the sheet is ground smooth and is laid out on a metal mold and placed back in to the oven. Finally the piece is ground at a grinding lathe with aluminum oxide or natural sandstone wheels to obtain the textured surface
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